Exhibition Inquisition

The stuff you look at, but don't see.

Posts Tagged ‘display case

Luis Meléndez: Master of the Spanish Still Life

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Los Angeles County Museum of Art

LACMA’s current exhibition: Luis Meléndez: Master of the Spanish Still Life (on view until January 3) has traveled from the National Gallery of Art in D.C. and is currently on view in LACMA’s European painting and sculpture galleries (which are currently closed for reinstallation).  The exhibition was originally organized by the National Gallery to celebrate its new acquisition of Meléndez’s work.  Works from the 18th century Spanish master are on loan from many collections, including the Prado, the Louvre, the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Kimbell Art Museum, and a few private collections.  The show at LACMA features 26 still lifes, one self portrait and an odd collection of kitchen artifacts.

Melendez Still Life with Melon and Pears

What nice melons you have.

Because I knew the shorter route to the two galleries the show occupies I initially missed the introductory wall text, so I went back to the front entrance to go through the show the direction in which the curators wanted me to.  The introductory wall text was set on a slab of a wall (on the back of which was hung Meléndez’s self portrait).  A nice gold title seemed fitting for an old master exhibition.  The wall text mostly sang the praises of Meléndez as a mostly-ignored master overshadowed by the formidable Goya.  This show it seems is a way of rediscovering a forgotten master.

walls

LACMA don’t you dare do this to the European galleries

The first thing I noticed about the galleries was the hideous treatment of the walls.  Christopher Knight of the LA Times gave his opinion, as have other bloggers.  And I am not alone in thinking that the walls are only ugly but also out of place in these galleries.  The odd plaster treatment (which LACMA’s Unframed blog claims makes “new walls look old”) are distracting and look like a project on a reality television home improvement show.

Frames

My rendering of the frames, thanks Microsoft Paint

Once I was able to get away from the odd walls, I was able to focus on the numerous still lifes.  What I noticed immediately was that most of the paintings had the exact same frames, gold with a pilaster-look and circles in the four corners.  This frame was used on works from the various collections the exhibition was culled from.  This made me think that most of these works came originally from the same place.

Something that made me aware that these paintings were not all from the same place was the wire partition set in front of only some of the paintings.  The paintings that were “special” enough to warrant the ugly wire partition (same wire from Your Bright Future) were the works from the Prado Museum.  The segments of wire were obnoxious—I felt that if any of the paintings were valuable enough to justify the wire partition they all should have had a partition, just run a wire all around the galleries.  I wasn’t the only one curious about the wire, another visitor asked a gallery guard about it.

Self Portrait_Prado

The Master Himself

The only painting that wasn’t a still life was Meléndez’s self portrait.  The portrait was an amazing addition to the now seemingly generic still lifes.  The self portrait was painted by Meléndez while he was still in school.  It is hung in a way that makes it a real centerpiece of the show, behind the wall with the exhibition title and intro text.  The portrait shows all the skill and technique required of a master painter, and the portrait shows Meléndez’s ambition and genius, which the exhibition claims were never fully realized.

Melendez Layout

I will keep making these diagrams until someone tells me they’re stupid.

The first room of the exhibition features mostly smaller works, and then the second contained both smaller and more extravagant tableaus of apples, grapes, watermelons, cantaloupes, etc.  I did have an issue with the order that one wall was hung.  Two works from the Prado museum, which a wall text clearly said “are probably pendants” were hung at opposite ends of the wall, with two large artichoke works dividing them.  Formally the two works: Still Life with Pomegranates, Apples, Azaroles, and Grapes in a Landscape and Still Life with Watermelons and Apples in a Landscape look like pendants, and I was confused why the curators did not hang the works directly next to each other, there seemed to be no reason why the weren’t.

Still Lifes

So, why aren’t these hung next to each other?

At the end of the second room are two display cases set into the walls of the galleries.  Inside the two cases were objects like wine coolers, chocolate pots, and other vessels which can be seen in the still lifes of Meléndez.

display case

Get it? That’s that thing in that painting.

Through some research I discovered that the addition of these objects was not LACMA’s idea, the curators at the National Gallery are responsible for the inclusion of the objects (however I still don’t forgive LACMA for the walls).  I understand that the objects are there to illustrate the skill required of Meléndez to depict such objects in such a high degree of realism.

more stuff

More stuff from the display cases

This display made me think; well if they’ve included the kitchen objects why not also include fruit from the still lifes in these cases.  This is ridiculous I know, but I think included these objects is just as ridiculous.  A visitor can see that the still lifes in this exhibition are extremely realistic, almost photographic.

Artichokes

Artichokes show the skill of a Master

The skill of Meléndez and this show as a tribute to a forgotten master seems unrealized in the size of this exhibition.  While the collection of paintings from many collections is an impressive feat on its own, I thought that some editing was in order.  Not all of the works in the show were Meléndez’s finest; the show could have been edited down to maybe half the size, with only the best of the works.  Featuring only the best of Meléndez’s work would have done Meléndez more justice, especially when trying to convince an audience that Meléndez is an underappreciated and mostly ignored artist.

Christ in Limbo

Christ in Limbo? What are you doing here?

As a final note, when exiting the Meléndez show one is confronted with LACMA’s Christ in Limbo.  The work, while Spanish, has nothing in common with the Meléndez show.  Christ in Limbo and two other painting remain in the chamber right after the Meléndez exhibition, they are remnants of the reinstallation of LACMA’s European galleries, but no other works are still on view, the curators should really remove the three works as they are out of place and starkly alone.

And please, please LACMA curators do not use the weird plaster technique on the walls in the European galleries once they are reinstalled as you have hinted at, save your money.

– H.I.

Joseph Beuys: The Multiples

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Los Angeles County Museum of Art

In case you forgot...

In case you forgot...

Continuing their hold of the top floor of LACMA’s BCAM, the Broad Art Foundation presents Joseph Beuys: The Multiples.  A collection of 570 multiples (from 1963-1986) fills the east galleries on the upper-most floor of the citadel for contemporary art. Since the second floor is now a venue for temporary exhibition, it seems the Broad Art Foundation is especially concerned with maintaining their stronghold on the top floor, and since it has been more than a year and a half since BCAM opened, its about time that a new installation of Broadwork was rotated in (at least to half of the floor).

Entry / Image of the artist

Entry / Image of the artist

Up the spider (the red, exterior escalator), and in through the colossal glass doors of the building…The first thing one sees is the Barbara Kruger freight elevator.  To the right are galleries with more Broadworks, Warhols and Koons, and only one Baldessari left.  But to the other direction, to the left, is the exhibition of Beuys multiples.

The first thing one sees is a rack with catalogs of the works in the exhibition.  Honestly, to be up front about it, I think that looking through this nicely designed little book would be more interesting and manageable than this overwhelming exhibition.  And then, Beuys confronts the viewer: an image of Beuys (on of the multiples in the show) is blown up and covers the entire wall leading into the exhibition. The title of the installation is superimposed on this large graphic.  Yes this is an installation and not an exhibition, LACMA has made the distinction. What qualifications make something an installation instead of an exhibition are unclear.

The exhibition installation, was contained in six rooms, which are defined by the pre-existing walls.  The plain white walls from which previously hung Rauschenbergs and Johns have now been painted a very, very dreary shade of grey.  The color is oddly familiar, was it the same color used in LACMA’s Art of the Two Germanys exhibition, those crude metal display cases certainly look familiar from Two Germanys as well.

Diagram, thank you Microsoft paint

Diagram, thank you Microsoft paint

The introductory wall text explains several thing, it explains what a multiple is, and the history of multiples including Marcel Duchamp and his Boite-en-valise.  Then came the rationale behind the organization of all those multiples, as well as some not-so-subtle bragging:

This presentation of the nearly complete set of Beuys’s multiples from the Broad Art Foundation is organized thematically within six rooms. The topics explored include Myth, Fluxus, teaching, environmentalism, political activism and the holocaust, and Beuys in America.

Each of the six rooms came complete with a title in white, an educational paragraph, and weirdly integrated quotes. The format was very thorough. And through all of the piles and masses of multiples, I looked always first for the paragraphs, to get some guiding hand through the many, many, many multiples.  (Do you get the point that there are a lot of multiples?)

MYTH: the paragraph addresses the mythology Beuys created around himself, that he was a pilot in the German air force during WWII and was shot down over Crimea, and then was nursed back to health by the Tartars. Well that was educational.  There was a LOT of stuff. Cases and cases, cases against the walls, lots of stuff hung from the walls, a long case (set on hobby horses) aligned along the hypotenuse of the room to allow for eve more stuff to be cluttered into the room.  There was so much stuff, that really it was the odd piece that stood out.  One such piece was Sled 1699, (which had its own descriptive wall text).  The work was set on a short platform that required some very flattering squatting for closer inspection, and was surrounded by black tape so I wouldn’t squat too close.

Room with a view of Fluxus

Room with a view of Fluxus

FLUXUS and PERFORMANCE: This room had the same format of title and wall text.  The quote that was integrated in: “Actions, Happenings and Fluxus will of course release new impulses which will, we hope, create better relationships in more areas”—a vague quotation.  In this room were also display cases, posters, artifacts of performance art, photographs documenting performances. A major difference from the last room was the tiny video monitor set into a short little pilaster-like architectural element.  Some simple dark wood chairs were set in front of monitor; you had to sit close to really see the video.

Stuff, stuff, lots of stuff own by the Broad Art Foundation

Stuff, stuff, lots of stuff own by the Broad Art Foundation

ENVIRONMENT: If I thought the previous two rooms were crowded, I had no idea what was to come.  The Environment room was the most crowded room, absolutely stuff-full of things. There was very little blank space on the walls, there were so many things hung from the walls that it necessitated a completely separate diagram labeling all of the works.  Some multiples from the same sets hung together, sometimes in rows, sometimes not.  In this room were more of the wooden chairs (no video) just to take in part of the gallery. This room was hung like a Parisian salon; frames rubbing up against one each other.  The work that separated itself from the rest was Hare Stone (1982, Basalt with gold spraypaint), again this piece was displayed on a short platform, but this time was partitioned off with metal wire fence (saw it in the Your Bright Future Show).

Between a rock and a hardplace

Between a rock and a hardplace

TEACHING in the F.U.I.: This was the sparsest room, seemed nicely relaxing on the eyes, especially after the environment room.  This room was nicely packed in, instead of cramped, there was an ease of the packed-in-ness that did not exist in the environment room.

My obsession with seating, some wood chairs

My obsession with seating, some wood chairs

POLITICAL ACTIVISM & The HOLOCAUST: more posters, more cases, more photos, same medium, slightly different subject matter.  The thing that set this room apart was the almost feature on Braunkreuz.  In the 1960s Beuys created this material called Braunkreuz, an opaque reddish-brown medium of paint mixed with other materials. Beuys marks his objects with crosses that allude to the steel cross, reclaiming symbols of Germany and Nazism.  See, I learned so much from the paragraph in that room.  Another video monitor and chairs were in this room in the same configuration as in the Fluxus room.  There was a lot of education in this room, which was really necessary for this exhibition.

I had no idea how high the ceilings were

I had no idea how high the ceilings were

BEUYS in AMERICA:  this room had an ease in the cramped quality of the space as well.  This might have been because the objects hung from the walls utilized the height of the wall: some things high and some things low.  A big banner was one thing displayed awkwardly up on high (like that one photograph in the Collecting History show at MOCA). In this final room was also a wall text likening Beuys to Yves Klein (French) and Warhol (American), claiming all of these artists created a artist-celebrity personality.  This is a nice attempt to create a continuous flow into the corridor which leads to the west-side of the top floor of BCAM.

In the hallway are some photos and objects, displayed in a tall case, from a collaborative project between Beuys and Warhol, but no information in provided, how frustrating. A continual comparison was made between Beuys and Warhol, and then also to Koons.  Two TV monitors with seating, two bookshelves full of books, and more upholstered chairs and a comfy couch created an odd domestic-like space in the cold sterile setting of BCAM.  Continuing with the usage of quotes, the curators include one quote each from Beuys, Warhol and Koons.

At home with Beuys, Warhol and Koons

At home with Beuys, Warhol and Koons

The west gallery on the top floor had been changed from its inaugural form, but only slightly altered and is still full of Broadworks. One wall was removed, which effectively eliminated the space that had previously displayed Baldessari, and now there is only one Baldessari left, on the wall which remains oddly alone in the space. The Koons had been spread out to fill the space. The space behind the lone wall is still only for Warhol: some works have been removed and tons more Kelloggs boxes have added, huge piles of boxes actually, created mountains of faux-cardboard containers.

It is great to see contemporary art in a space that was constructed to showcase exactly that.  The Beuys installation is a fitting example of post war German art because of its nice connection to the Art of the Two Germanys show.  But it also seemed like the installation was a way for the Broad Art Foundation to maintain its claim the top floor of BCAM as exclusive space to display their art. Also the wording of the text seemed to not-so-subtly brag about their near complete collection of Beuys’s multiples.

Some lovely "Urban Light"

Some lovely "Urban Light"

It was also exciting to see LACMA at night, especially the space of BCAM, which is lit so different at night, it really is a must see. Especially when you get to scamper, swing, dance through my favorite public artwork in Los Angeles, Urban Light.

– H.I.

Divine Demons: Wraithful Deities in Buddhist Art

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Norton Simon Museum

The “Fierce deities with bared teeth, flame-like tongues, and wicked expressions” of this exhibition are contained to a small concise space, but the show itself is rich and meaningful.  The show is unavoidable because of where it is located.  At the bottom of the staircase down to the Asian galleries of the Norton Simon, there it is: a nice little alcove of a space, nicely tucked away.

Can’t miss this exhibition

Can’t miss this exhibition

Only approximately 20 works make up the exhibition, most of them are small-scale and necessitate a closer, intimate inspection.  The Norton Simon has also done an amazing job with the education of this show.  There is a large wall text which nicely explains the items in the exhibition:

“These powerful figures also destroy demons and inner obstacles to enlightenment, such as greed and anger. Their frightening appearance belie the good deeds they perform in protecting individual devotees, monasteries and Buddhist doctrine…In the photo below, the Dalai Lama of Tibet, holding a ritual thunderbolt and bell, performs an initiation ceremony seated in front of a large appliquéd image depicting wrathful gods.”

This wall text was very informative, though some sentences were constructed awkwardly. The mention of the Dalai Lama seemed to be a reference to something from Tibetan culture which perhaps was somewhat recognizable the audience of museum.  Along with the introductory wall text, every item in the exhibition had an accompanying wall label with an educational paragraph

Interesting to me was the color chosen in this room.  The medium-tone blue paint was too-odd-to-be-a-coincidence similar to the blue-colored walls in LACMA’s Tibetan galleries.  To be fare the color was located elsewhere in that level of the museum, but I’m curious as to why this color is so popular in being partnered with Tibetan art.

Blue on blue, nice frames

Blue on blue, nice frames

The museum has provided two small, wooden, yet comfortable benches in the small space. The only medium not present in the small exhibition was stone sculpture, but these works were displayed right outside this space, and were all very large.  The show was focused on the close inspection of small intimate objects.

Show and tell of Buddhist treasures

Show and tell of Buddhist treasures

The exhibition was strikingly symmetrical.  The C-shaped exhibition was reflective on left and right.  Along the right wall were watercolors and small sculptures.  One watercolor was framed in a blue mat and ark wood frame, which matched another watercolor across the room which made me think that the works might have been acquired by the same time, or come from the same place.

It's in the details: flames and skulls, very rock & roll

It's in the details: flames and skulls, very rock & roll

The display case along this wall contained six objects.  The objects are made from a wide range of medium, from different times, but all from Tibet.  An accompanying diagram to the right of the case provided the labels for these objects as well as more educational information.  This small case was like a treasure chest full of precious objects. The workmanship and the details were beautiful in this case, including the carving of a conch shell, and the small inlaid eyes of a skull.

Chakrasamuara: decapitated-head necklaces are so in right now

Chakrasamuara: decapitated-head necklaces are so in right now

Another example of small scale details was in another small plexiglass display case.  The small bronze sculpture of Chakrasamuara & Vajravarchi (China, lat 18th c.) invited close inspection.  The wall text described in detail the gruesome nature of the details: “Each of Chakrasamuara’s four faces has a fierce expression, a fierce eye and a skull tiara. In addition he wears garlands of skulls and severed heads and in his 12 arms holds various attributes: a lasso, and arrows, as well as a thunderbolt and bell.”  This description encouraged further investigation of the piece, were those really garlands of heads draped around the figures neck?—Why yes there were, isn’t that precious…

Mandala at the center of the universe / exhibition

Mandala at the center of the universe / exhibition

This work led to the central (in terms of location) work of the exhibition.  The Mandala of Chakrasamuara (Nepal, Kathmandu, 1648) is a large painting featuring the same demonic character as the sculpture directly to the right.  Again, a beautiful description accompanies: “surrounding the palace are eight graveyards, separated by stylized waves representing rivers. These charnel grounds…” All of the wording of these texts is very vivid, and helps to explain not only what we are seeing, but also utilizing colorful language which achieves a grim effect integral to this installation examining violence and demons.

From the prop shop?—No, from the Norton Simon

From the prop shop?—No, from the Norton Simon

Speaking of violence, the case to the left of the Mandala painting holds some sensational objects, which honestly look like props from a Hollywood movie.  The case with ritual weapons holds a Ritual Staff or Club (Tibet 20th c.) and a Ritual Axe (Tibet 20th c.).  These objects finalize and literalize the exhibition’s theme of violence.

Orange is the new white box

Orange is the new white box

Among the hall of blue were accent colors.  Three items were distinguished by their special mounting in the exhibition.  A wooden ritual sword from Tibet, a bronze sculpture of Hayagriva, and a mask of Bhairara were displayed differently from the rest of the works in the room.  All of them were displayed in specially made shadow boxes.  The frames clearly had been made specially for this exhibition because they were made to look like they were attached to the walls permanently, and painted the same blue color.  However, the accent was the orange color used on the interiors of these frames.  But why the bright orange color? To admit the first thing I thought of when I saw the color in this context was that it was the color of Buddhist monastic robes (which could be seen in the images of the Dalai Lama in the exhibition). The orange accents did a lot to subtly highlight these works.

Diagram of back wall, thanks Microsoft paint

Diagram of back wall, thanks Microsoft paint

These objects fit nicely into the symmetry of the exhibition.  All in all the small show was informative and beautiful, showing that even topics of violence can be beautiful.

– H.I.

Permanent Collection – Korean Galleries Reinstallation

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Los Angeles County Museum of Art

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art recently opened their new display of the museum’s permanent collection of Korean art.  The new space, on the plaza level of the Hammer Building,  is the largest space devoted to the display of Korean art outside Korea.  The museum used the existing space (which was previously used for temporary exhibition), and made only small changes to the architecture.  The space still exists as a cycle of rooms which are easy and pleasing to traverse.

After entering the double doors of the gallery you are greeted by an opening in the wall, which has been flanked by traditional paper windows, which are opened like shutters.

Highlighting loan pieces

Highlighting loan pieces

The space showcases a loan piece: The Pensive Bodhisattva, which which is graciously being loaned from the National Museum of Korea.  Also in the entry room is an approachable wall text which introduces briefly the historic periods of Korea that the works on display come from.  It also explains that the galleries are organized thematically versus by time period or by region.  This reminded me of the way the Getty Villa organizes its galleries, which I think they do successfully.  On the left side of the entry way there is a large blown-up photograph of a Korean temple, if front of which is a long bench.

Room with a view

Room with a view

The galleries had the same cement floors that previously existed in the space, except in the entry room where new luscious hardwood floors have been installed.  The walls were all a very clean white, which when inspected closer were not painted, but actually crisp rice paper.

The first room had just one object in it: a beautiful painted map of Korea.  The map is also a loan piece, but when it was displayed by itself it served as a nice way to introduce the artistic region of Korea.  Already it was obvious that the loan pieces were being displayed with great respect, and were highlighted throughout the exhibition.  The National Museum of Korea loaned LACMA a selection of 26 artworks for the opening of these galleries.

The second room focus was on painting.  The dimly-lit rooms felt warm dispute the cold cement floors and simple wood benches allowed the visitors to sit down and appreciate the paintings. Large landscapes were displayed on one wall, vertical hanging scrolls on another, and large scale portraits on the far wall.  The way the paintings were displayed in correlation to one another I though was done in a very interesting way.  There seemed to be an effort to not display things in a way that involved symmetry or balance.

Painting gallery – screens & scrolls
DSCN0937 (5-6)

Painting gallery – screens & scrolls

The two landscapes were unbalanced, the hanging scrolls purposely hung to deny bilateral symmetry, and the portraits seemed to be hung left to right in descending order.  On the fourth wall of this room was a display case with smaller scale paintings.  The paintings inside presented a variety of the ways painting could be mounted, on silk, on paper, and even on long scrolls.  A video screen even showed the entire scroll in the case unrolled.  This video was only one of many in the galleries. The didactic videos never had sound and only short snippets of text to read.  In the paintings room there was a video which showed how brush paintings are made and focused on showing technique.

A Queen’s screen

A Queen’s screen

The next room had several areas.  In the first area was displayed the “Women’s Quarters.” This area featured several painted screens which were conveniently displayed on the ground and on angles, to show how the screens actually functioned.  Also in this room were glorious glass display cases containing luxury objects.  Some cases featured only one object and some contained several objects that had similar utilitarian uses. The cases were themselves beautiful modern art objects glittering in their brand-spanking-newness.  The cases were designed by One O One Architects, and fuse contemporary look with traditional Korean materials.

Utilitarian treasures

Utilitarian treasures

On the other side of the room more display cases contained a slew of objects like ceramics, tiles, and hats.  I found the hats particularly interesting because they seemed to be the exact hats that were worn by some of the men in the portraits from the previous painting room.  It was an excellent curatorial choice to display the actual objects is such close proximity to the painted versions.  You had to go back into the painting room to continue on to other rooms, so the comparison and recognition of the objects in the portraits was unavoidable.

I just saw that hat

I just saw that hat

The next thematic room was what I assumed was the religion room.  The room featured sculpture and painting.  A longer video ran on another small discrete monitor which informed in a very subtle way the motifs and subject matter of Korean religious art.  The inclusion of both painting and sculpture was very clever as it invited comparisons about the way the same subject, themes, and story are depicted in various mediums.  Two sculptures were displayed side by side, and a formal comparison of metal and wooden sculpture was displayed.

Religious images, in wood and gold

Religious images, in wood and gold

Then it was onto to see the star of the exhibition, the loan piece of The Pensive Bodhisattva.  The piece is here in America for only a few weeks, and when you view it, you will know why Korea wants it back so quickly.  The sculpture is a masterpiece of the late sixth century.  The gilt-bronze Bodhisattva was cast in a now lost technique, and is uncommonly large in scale.  I noticed that there were cushions or pads in the room.  They were left there after a ceremony in which monks came and blessed the galleries.  The curators decided to leave the pads there for viewers to meditate on.  Or a viewer can simple walk around the Korean treasure and enjoy it in the round.

National Treasure: “The Pensive Bodhisattva”

National Treasure: “The Pensive Bodhisattva”

After this bright room was a dark room which featured works organized thematically around the art of the literati.  Brushes and small works of calligraphy were displayed in one case.  I did not stay long in this room because I was quickly courted on into the next room due to the fact that it was flooded with natural light.

Most beautiful room in LACMA

Most beautiful room in LACMA

I’m not used to seeing natural light flood the space of a gallery, which is only one of the reasons why the ceramics room was such a treat.  The exhibition designers decided to remove the existing wall, and exposed the large floor-to-ceiling windows that were behind the wall.  In front of the window are five large ceramic vessels; behind them through the windows is the green of the bark and large planter boxes full of bamboo.  This room might be the most beautiful room I’ve ever seen in an art museum.

Color-categorized ceramics

Color-categorized ceramics

The display cases in this room were organized by type of ceramic.  So in one case would be only blue and white ceramics made from Kaolin, in another would be only the jade-tone Punchong ceramics, and in another would be a collection of rich green celadon glazed ware.  One case in this room also displayed a collection of lacquer boxes. All of them were ornately decorated in mother-of-pearl inlay.  With all of these cases in the room the small differences were what matter, so in the lacquer boxes only small differences in decorative motif separated the boxes.  The close inspection required to viewer to really look closely at the works on display.

Celedon glazed ware & Turquoise inlay lacquer boxes

Celedon glazed ware & Turquoise inlay lacquer boxes

In the last room was a really innovative installation of objects.  The narrow hall forces a reflection between the grid-like contemporary painting with an innovative display case of ceramic shards.  The shards are a selection from LACMA’s 850 piece Asakawa-Henderson Korean Ceramic Shard Collection.  The collection was created by two Japanese researchers during the 1910’s and ‘20s.  According to the exhibition’s press release, “LACMA is the only institution outside Korea and Japan to hold such a comprehensive collection.”  The shards are displayed in a long case in a color-coded grid.  The accompanying map is the key to the map, where different colors signify Korea’s eight main provincial regions.  The educational tool is functional and really beautiful; a truly innovative way to communicate information to a museum’s public while still being aesthetically pleasing.

Asakawa-Henderson Korean Ceramic Shard Collection

Asakawa-Henderson Korean Ceramic Shard Collection

The reinstallation as a whole is very beautiful, and not just because it is new.  It shows that permanent collections can be displayed in creative ways that aren’t too theatrical or zany (like LAMCA’s Pardo-design Pre-Columbian galleries).  The new display also proves that education can be displayed in a non-distracting way, and that giving the viewer to freedom to choose his or her level of engagement with the educational materials really is the best way to do it.  I can’t wait to return to these galleries, because they are now my favorite in Los Angeles.

Comparison installation

Comparison installation

– H.I.