Exhibition Inquisition

The stuff you look at, but don't see.

Posts Tagged ‘marketing

Summer Exhibitions

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LACMA

LACMA’s near acre of new exhibition space, the Resnick Pavilion, means LACMA has a lot of exhibitions to program.  And they seem up to the task.  After the three inaugural shows (Olmec, Fashion, and Eye for the Sensual), LACMA has managed to keep the Resnick Pavilion at full capacity.  There are three shows currently in the space: David Smith: Cubes and Anarchy, Gifts of the Sultan: The Arts of Giving at the Islamic Courts, and LACMA’s ticketed blockbuster: Tim Burton.  The shows keep with Michael Govan’s strategy for offering unrelated coinciding shows in the Resnick Pavilion.

Across from the Resnick Pavilion, is Renzo Piano’s other LACMA building, BCAM; it too has been kept full. The top floor is still stocked with Broadworks, the second floor is being deinstalled from the recent permanent collection show Human Nature, and the ground floor just had one of the massive Serra sculptures deinstalled, to make room for a new Burden work, which is going to be AWESOME.

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Marketing: Zara Window Displays

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Koons Inspiration

It is well known fashion designers find inspiration from fine art (post on Balenciaga coming soon).  Walking around the loop, I discovered advertisers of fashion are inspired by fine art as well, contemporary art even.  The Zara store in Block 37 has window displays that look a lot like a certain contemporary pop artist.  After my two posts on museum advertising, I was blown away to see a specific, and familiar (familiar to some at least) contemporary art piece utilized in a window display of trendy clothing store Zara.  The florescent lighting and metallic cylinder forms shouted “Jeff Koons!” so loud to me I almost snapped my neck doing a double-take.

I’m not the only one who sees Koons here right?

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Museum Marketing: Kings, Queens, and Courtiers: Art in Early Renaissance France

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Art Institute of Chicago

If you’re like me, you already check out your reflection in the huge windows of ground floor lobbies in downtown.  Don’t lie; it’s impossible not to when faced with such large expanses of glass.  The Art Institute’s marketing campaign for its current temporary exhibition, show Kings, Queens, and Courtiers: Art in Early Renaissance France only makes things worse (or better).  Better.  Museums in Chicago love a creative marketing campaign (see previous post on The Horse at the Field).

Look at yourself, just look at yourself!

Why this campaign is better than the Horse campaign: The campaign uses artwork in the exhibition.  Both Jean Bourdichon’s Louis XII Kneeling in Prayer (1498/99) and Leonardo Da Vinci’s Madonna of the Yarnwinder are used.  (The latter is the clear superstar of the show.)  The marketing campaign pairs these paintings with large, silver, reflective material, on which are printed crowns and scepters.  The idea is to look into these mirrors and picture yourself as a King or Queen, or as a Madonna…

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Museum Marketing: The Horse

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Field Museum

The Field Museum loves owned media particularly social media (the stuff you don’t pay for).  It has a brand new website, facebook, twitter (Sue the t-rex even has her own), flickr, and yes it still has a myspace.  With all this owned media, you would think they would be paying for much promotion.  Despite all its social media the Field still likes to pay major ducats for marketing campaigns and advertisements.  These campaigns range from creative and innovative, to downright awful (and probably grossly expensive).  There was that time the loop was invaded by theme park pirate sculptures, then there was the time with unicorns into the St. Patrick’s parade, there was also that time they converted buses into wooly mammoths, and also that time they projected a mermaid on the buildings along Michigan Avenue (sorry couldn’t find a link for this one).  The Field is like case study book for a marketing class.

Let’s explore.

The current temporary exhibition at the Field Museum is The Horse. The show is organized by the American Museum of Natural History (they love to rent out shows) in collaboration with The Field, as well as with the Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage, the Canadian Museum of Civilization, and the San Diego Natural History Museum (an eclectic bunch).  The marketing campaign for show can be seen in bus shelters (way popular placement for the Field), as well as whizzing past on top of taxi cabs.

Trojan Pig.

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